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September 22, 2016

UK Dstl demonstrates wearable sensor technology capabilities

The UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) has successfully demonstrated the automatic threat detection capabilities of its wearable sensor technology, dismounted close combat sensors (DCCS) system.

By Srivari Aishwarya

The UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) has successfully demonstrated the automatic threat detection capabilities of its wearable sensor technology, dismounted close combat sensors (DCCS) system.

The new DCCS system was developed in a collaboration between Dstl, Roke Manor Research, QinetiQ and Systems Engineering and Assessment (SEA) for use in military and emergency services.

This wearable sensor system enables navigation even when GPS signals are not available, by using inertial and visual navigation sensors.

It considers last known GPS locations and integrates information from visually tracked features captured by a helmet camera and inertial sensors.

The DCCS accurately tracks the location of an individual within buildings and tunnels, Dstl said in a statement.

"In addition to providing military advantage, we’ve also seen how DCCS lends itself as a testing platform to bring technology to the frontline faster."

Roke Manor Research DCCS project lead engineer Mark Coleman said: “We independently considered 252 fledgling technologies from across industry, academia and beyond, before developing, distilling and fusing them to create the concept of an integrated wearable sensor system, which we then built and trialled.

“In addition to providing military advantage, we’ve also seen how DCCS lends itself as a testing platform to bring technology to the frontline faster.”

The system has a combination of camera, laser and orientation sensors mounted on the personal weapon.

Its acoustic and camera technology automatically identifies where enemy weapons are being fired from and this information is transmitted to the wearer and to commanders.

DCCS is expected to enter service in the 2020s.


Image: The new dismounted close combat sensors (DCCS) system enables navigation even when GPS signals are not available. Photo: courtesy of UK Government.

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