Saab contracted to deliver Carl-Gustaf components to undisclosed customer

18 March 2015 (Last Updated March 18th, 2015 18:30)

Saab has been awarded a contract to supply Carl-Gustaf man-portable weapon system components to an undisclosed customer.

Carl Gutsaf

Saab has been awarded a contract to supply Carl-Gustaf man-portable weapon system components to an undisclosed customer.

Under the terms of Skr127m ($14m) contract, the company will provide unspecified components for the ground support weapon system.

The contract also includes an option for additional orders with a combined value of Skr62m ($7m).

Saab Dynamics business area head Görgen Johansson said: "Carl-Gustaf is a world-leading weapon system and this order is a further proof of our customers trust in the system."

Manufactured by Saab Bofors Dynamics, Carl-Gustaf is an 84mm reusable, shoulder-fired, multirole recoilless rifle, designed to help troops effectively engage enemy rocket-propelled grenades and machine gun attacks from ranges of 900m and beyond.

Operated by a two-man crew, the weapon also supports gunnery and combat training objectives with sub-calibre trainers and full-calibre practice rounds and simulators.

"The weapon provides various types of ammunition, ranging from armour penetration and anti-personnel, to ammunition for built-up areas."

The weapon provides various types of ammunition, ranging from armour penetration and anti-personnel, to ammunition for built-up areas and special features such as smoke and illumination.

Carl-Gutsaf is currently used by 40 countries worldwide, including Australia, Belgium, Canada, India, Germany and Malaysia, as well as the US and UK.

Saab has successively upgraded and modified the system to address new requirements, and launched the lightweight Carl-Gustaf M4 in autumn 2014, to provide users with flexible capability and help soldiers to remain agile in any scenario.

Deliveries under the contract are scheduled to take place between this year and 2017.


Image: A Carl-Gustaf recoilless rifle of the Norwegian Army. Photo: courtesy of Soldatnytt.