Military service children lack opportunities to progress into higher education, says study

21 June 2016 (Last Updated June 21st, 2016 18:30)

A recent study in the UK has revealed that children in families with military backgrounds lack opportunities to progress into higher education.

A recent study in the UK has revealed that children in families with military backgrounds lack opportunities to progress into higher education.

Conducted by the University of Winchester, the year-long investigation was backed by funding from the UK Ministry of Defence.

The study examined data from service children and their parents, analysed literature and large national data sets, and gathered feedback from the children about what they need from their teachers and schools.

"The experiences of military service children give them unique strengths, including the independence and resilience needed to flourish at university."

Undergraduate students from military service families were also interviewed

Figures released by the report show that nearly 40% of military service children able to progress into higher education were unlikely to do so.

The report also highlights that housing status, parents' education and the number of schools attended has no impact on children's intention to study at university.

University of Winchester Senior Lecturer in Education Dr Judith McCullouch said: "The experiences of military service children give them unique strengths, including the independence and resilience needed to flourish at university.

"We must work together to ensure that these children are able to access the opportunities they need and want in order to progress through education.

"What is missing is a coherent, systematic approach to monitoring and supporting their educational progression."

The University of Winchester plans to create an alliance of organisations, with the aim of supporting service children's university education.