Raytheon cleared to resume work on US Army’s new electronic warfare project

16 October 2014 (Last Updated October 16th, 2014 18:30)

Raytheon has been ordered by the US Army to resume work on the new electronic warfare planning and management tool (EWPMT) programme.

Raytheon has been ordered by the US Army to resume work on the new electronic warfare planning and management tool (EWPMT) programme.

The order follows a ruling by the US Court of Federal Claims rejecting a protest filed by Sotera Defense Solutions.

Sotera originally won the $100m EWPMT contract in June 2013, but it was awarded to Raytheon in December of the same year after the company filed a protest with the Government Accountability Office.

"The benefits include enhanced situational awareness, actionable intelligence and synchronised operations."

The protest forced the army to re-evaluate its selection criteria and eventually cancel the five-year, indefinite-delivery / indefinite-quantity contract with Sotera.

Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Electronic Warfare Systems vice-president Travis Slocumb said: "This programme will equip combat forces with essential EW mission planning capabilities they didn't have before.

"The benefits include enhanced situational awareness, actionable intelligence and synchronised operations."

The EWPMT programme aims to provide army officers with automated tools that will help in the planning and execution of complex electronic warfare missions.

The software combines intelligence and terrain data to provide a common operational picture of the electromagnetic spectrum, enabling the army's electronic warfare experts to defeat enemy electronic signals and safeguard US and allied signals.

Work under the contract, which represents the first step in managing a group of technologies that are part of the army's broader Integrated EW System, is scheduled to be carried out at Raytheon facilities in Indiana and Maryland, US.

In a separate development, the company has handed over the tenth army navy / transportable radar surveillance-2 (AN/TPY-2) radar to the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) for integration into the army's fifth terminal high-altitude area defence (THAAD) battery.

The high-resolution, X-band AN/TPY-2 radar is designed for long-range acquisition, precision tracking and discrimination of all ballistic missiles, from short-range to intercontinental ballistic missiles during the ascent phase of flight.

Raytheon is also building two radars for a US ally in the Arabian Gulf region.

Defence Technology