Lockheed to offer missile defense sensor for US Army’s LTAMDS programme

19 July 2016 (Last Updated July 19th, 2016 18:30)

Lockheed Martin will provide its new army missile defense sensor, in response to the US Army's request for information regarding the lower tier air and missile defense sensor (LTAMDS) acquisition programme.

Lockheed Martin will provide its new army missile defense sensor, in response to the US Army's request for information regarding the lower tier air and missile defense sensor (LTAMDS) acquisition programme.

The LTAMDS programme aims to upgrade or replace the current Patriot radar to improve the operational effectiveness against emerging threats.

The new sensor is required to meet mobility and transportability requirements, as well as improve reliability, availability and maintainability at a defined cost target.

"Our radar solution will meet the army's specific requirements and extend our strong collaboration within the missile defence community."

Operating in the army's integrated air and missile defense (IAMD) network, the radar technology will address the operational and logistic deficiencies of the Patriot.

Lockheed Martin air and missile defense vice-president Tim Cahill said: "With this request for information, the army recognises that a new radar is required to meet the current and emerging air and missile defence threats.

“This is an important milestone, another clear indication that the army recognises the ageing Patriot weapon system is insufficient to meet modern air and missile defence operational requirements.”

Lockheed Martin is said to be the only company to produce active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars for the army, as well as manufacture and export gallium nitride (GaN)-based AESA radars.

The company is investing $3bn in radar technology programmes, such as medium extended air defense system (MEADS), space fence, long-range discrimination radars (LRDR), 3D expeditionary long-range radars (3DELRR), AN / TPQ-53 and Aegis.

Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training vice-president Brad Hicks said: "Leveraging our existing technology, a multi-function, 360-degree IAMD radar can be developed to exceed the LTAMDS requirement on a better schedule than a costly Patriot upgrade solution.

"Our radar solution will meet the army's specific requirements and extend our strong collaboration within the missile defence community."