Lockheed Martin completes munitions testing for ATACMS and GMLRS

9 November 2015 (Last Updated November 9th, 2015 18:30)

Lockheed Martin has successfully completed munitions tests for its army tactical missile system (ATACMS) and guided multiple-launch rocket system (GMLRS).

Lockhead

Lockheed Martin has successfully completed munitions tests for its army tactical missile system (ATACMS) and guided multiple-launch rocket system (GMLRS).

The company tested the munitions using a high-mobility artillery rocket system (HIMARS) at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, US.

Part of the US Army's tactical munitions reliability programme, the tests comprised eight GMLRS rockets, which were conditioned at hot and ambient temperatures.

The flight tests were carried out using simulated targets.

The ATACMS unitary missile is the current production configuration, and was conditioned at a hot temperature for the test.

"Lockheed Martin's HIMARS, ATACMS and GMLRS precision fire solutions provide critical, quick-strike capabilities."

The HIMARS launcher can fire ATACMS and GMLRS munitions at ranges between 15km and 300km.

Soldiers began launching the missiles from inside the HIMARS' armoured cab.

Lockheed Martin missiles and fire control tactical missiles vice-president Ken Musculus said: "Lockheed Martin's HIMARS, ATACMS and GMLRS precision fire solutions provide critical, quick-strike capabilities to US and allied forces worldwide."

Operational since 2005, the HIMARS combines a wheeled chassis with MLRS firepower.

It can carry a single six-pack of rockets or one ATACMS missile, and can launch the entire MLRS family of munitions.

The launcher is C-130-transportable, and can be deployed into areas previously inaccessible to heavier launchers.

Lockheed Martin, the US Army and the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) recently completed an operational test for their ballistic missile defence system (BMDS).


Image: Lockheed Martin HIMARS launcher fires both GMLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles to strike targets with surgical precision. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto / Lockheed Martin Corporation.