IDF Ground Forces establish advanced simulation laboratory

23 January 2013 (Last Updated January 23rd, 2013 03:45)

The Ground Forces Command of the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) has established a new, advanced laboratory to better support training requirements of its soldiers.

The Ground Forces Command of the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) has established a new, advanced laboratory to better support training requirements of its soldiers.

Equipped with advanced simulators, the laboratory is primarily designed to enable the companies to practice complex battle scenarios to enhance their mission readiness without requiring a live-fire exercise.

Manufactured by the Military Research Department, the simulators are capable of creating a broad spectrum of real-time operational scenarios by precisely replicating enemy figures, weapons and territory during training sorties.

“It is necessary to change the scenarios slightly each time in order to challenge the soldiers.”

The laboratory has already hosted a joint training programme for the soldiers from the Givati Brigade's Anti-Tank Company and Military Research and Light Arms Departments officials in early January 2013.

Training featured six scenarios every day, each lasting for an average of 40 minutes, until all the targets were destroyed and planned objectives were achieved.

Light Arms Department officer captain Itai said the idea behind conducting maximum possible scenarios was to test whether similar results and statistical significance could be achieved every time.

"In the next scenario, we'll add more enemy fighters to the mission, we'll upgrade [the enemy's] weapons and maybe we'll bring them closer to our soldiers,'' Itai added.

"It is necessary to change the scenarios slightly each time in order to challenge the soldiers."

Mission strategies for each scenario were planned in advance by the battalion commander, and each soldier assigned one of the posts they had been specifically trained for.

Difficulty level was increased for each scenario, and the simulation was broadcast on a television screen from every angle in an effort to help participants perform better in the battlefield.