DAGR missile completes air worthiness release live firing flight tests

24 March 2014 (Last Updated March 24th, 2014 18:30)

Lockheed Martin’s direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missile has successfully demonstrated its ability as an air-launched weapon during a series of air worthiness release (AWR) live firing flight tests at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US.

DAGR missile

Lockheed Martin's direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missile has successfully demonstrated its ability as an air-launched weapon during a series of air worthiness release (AWR) live firing flight tests at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US.

During each of the 16 flight tests, the missile locked onto the laser spot illuminating the target before launch, and flew between 1.5km and 5.1km and hit the target within one meter of the laser spot, following launch from an AH-64D Apache helicopter.

Lockheed Martin missiles and fire control close combat systems development program manager Kevin Fitzpatrick said the flight tests confirm DAGR's ability to safely launch and separate from a moving, diving platform without degrading aircraft or weapon performance.

"These tests also validate DAGR production readiness at our Ocala operations facility," Fitzpatrick added.

Lockheed completed DAGR system qualification testing before AWR testing, which validated the missile and rail-mounted canister for use in aircraft captive carry, storage and transportation operations.

Specifically, the 30 system qualification guided flights demonstrated the missile's ability to hit moving targets, devastate tactical targets, such as structures and trucks, and achieve high accuracy when launched with a 7° offset, up to 6km away from the target.

DAGR is a 2.75in / 70mm precision-strike, air-to-ground weapon to destroy non-armoured or lightly armoured high-value targets located close to civilian assets or friendly forces with minimum collateral damage.

Fully compatible with Hellfire II laser guided missiles, the DAGR offers lock-on-after-launch (LOAL) and lock-on-before-launch (LOBL) capabilities, target handoff, enhanced built-in testing on the rail, and laser coding from the cockpit, enabling pilots to efficiently pursue offset targets.

Launched from multiple Hellfire-equipped rotary wing platforms, including the AH-64D Apache, AH-6 Little Bird and OH-58 Kiowa Warrior helicopters, the missile has to-date completed 40 guided flight tests from ranges of 1km to 6km.


Image: A direct attack-guided rocket missile during testing at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US. Photo: courtesy of B4Ctom1.

Defence Technology