3D printing and defence: Leading militaries named

5 November 2019 (Last Updated July 22nd, 2020 17:37)

The 3D printing industry was worth $3bn in 2013 and grew to $7bn in 2017. GlobalData forecasts the 3D printing market to account for more than $20bn in spend by 2025.

3D printing and defence: Leading militaries named

The 3D printing industry was worth $3bn in 2013 and grew to $7bn in 2017. GlobalData forecasts the 3D printing market to account for more than $20bn in spend by 2025.

As 3D printing develops it is now starting to be realised in a wide variety of industries, but its potential in the aerospace and defence industry is significant and most major militaries and companies are exploring their options with the technology.

Some are still in the testing phase, while others are actually deploying the technology in final production. This is particularly true in the aerospace industry, where engines, aircraft and even satellites are using 3D printed components at present.

Listed below are the militaries that have taken an early lead in implementing 3D printing technology, as identified by GlobalData.

US Marine Corps

The US Marine Corps currently has the highest uptake of any military service worldwide, due to their force posture. In particular, the Additive Manufacturing Team at Marine Corps Systems Command has created the world’s largest 3d concrete printer, with the ability to print a 500-square-foot barracks hut in 40 hours.

US Air Force

The US Air force is integrating 3D printing into its supply chain. Overseen by “America Makes”, the US national additive manufacturing/3D printing innovation institute, they are investigating how current systems can be used to reproduce aircraft components for decades-old planes that may no longer have reliable sources of replacement parts, without minimum order quantities.

US Navy

The Navy has created new logistical units such as Navy frontline attachments which can rapidly create spare parts for incredibly complex military equipment such as the F-35B, and are currently operational for this purpose. The navy has also worked with Oak Ridge National laboratory to produce the first 3d printed submarine hull.

US Army

The army is working on 3D printed, modular drone systems. The army wants 3D printers that can be deployed to a forward base camp and used to produce aviation backup when necessary for troops on the ground. This plan is aimed at creating bespoke UAV systems and is said to be at an advanced stage of development.

Chinese Airforce

A 3D Systems ProJet 4500printerhas been acquired by the Chinese army and has been working on replacement military truck parts for the army’s fuel tanker fleet. A number of Chinese fighter jets are believed to be carrying 3D printed parts and are in operation currently.

Russian Army

Russia has been testing multiple applications for 3D printed parts in its newest main battle tank, the T-14 Armata. During the development process, 3D printing was used for prototyping but it is expected that parts will be used in the final product, of which 2,300 have been ordered. Russia has also launched its first 3D printed satellite, in 2017.

South Korean Air Force

Collaboration between South Korea’s InssTEK and France’s Z3DLAB is producing parts for South Korean warplanes that see heavy use along the border with North Korea. The aim is to actually upgrade existing components rather than simply replace worn parts, with a new titanium composite material.

This is an edited extract from 3D Printing in Aerospace & Defence – Thematic Research report produced by GlolbalData Thematic Research.

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