US DoD begins Ballistic Missile Defense Review


The US Department of Defense (DoD) has commenced its Ballistic Missile Defense Review (BMDR) in order to identify ways to strengthen missile defence capabilities.

According to DoD, the review will evaluate the threats posed by ballistic missiles and develop a missile defence posture to address current and future challenges.

One of the department's highest priorities is to defend the nation and US interests abroad from ballistic missiles.

The move was directed by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, DoD chief spokesperson Dana W. White said in a statement.

The review will focus on rebalancing homeland and theatre defence priorities and providing the necessary policy and strategy framework for the nation's missile defence systems, according to the statement.

"The BMDR will conclude in a final report and is expected to be delivered to the US President by the end of this year."

Running alongside the  Nuclear Posture Review, the BMDR will be led by the deputy secretary of defence and the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and include interagency partners.

It is said to be a legislatively-mandated review that establishes US nuclear policy, strategy, capabilities and force posture for the next five to ten years.

The BMDR will conclude in a final report and is expected to be delivered to the US President by the end of this year.

Former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Michèle Flournoy described six major priorities in 2010 to shape the country's missile defence.

The priorities include defending the US from a limited ballistic missile attack and against growing regional threats.

According to Flournoy, new systems must be tested under realistic conditions before they are deployed to ensure their effectiveness.

In addition, she argued that the DoD must develop new fiscally sustainable capabilities and flexible capabilities that can adapt as threats evolve.