News, views and contacts from the global Army industry
 

US Army establishes new proteomics research facility

19 November 2012

Proteomics Core Facility

The US Army has established a new Proteomics Core Facility, to support basic and applied research projects aimed at developing solutions to counter an array of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) issues.

Jointly opened by the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (MRICD), the facility is designed to support Defense Threat Reduction Agency/Joint Science and Technology Chemical and Biological Defense Programme, MRICD and ECBC objectives to improvement soldiers' defence against chemical and biological threats.

ECBC technical director Joseph Wienand said the facility represented a collaborative effort by scientists to enable resources sharing and cost-savings, while working towards the common goal of increasing protection of troops and the country.

"Having a combined genomics and proteomics core now allows us to more easily share our resources, provide new training opportunities, and expand the amount and type of research we both can do."

ECBC Proteomics Core Facility project lead molecular toxicologist PhD, Jennifer Sekowski said: "Having a combined genomics and proteomics core now allows us to more easily share our resources, provide new training opportunities, and expand the amount and type of research we both can do."

The new facility was opened after one year of collaboration; it will enable the organisations to support sponsored research currently underway in whole genomic sequencing and finishing, transcriptome analysis, as well as expression analysis and microRNA.

In addition, the facility will help ECBC and MRICD further expand their research through advanced techniques, such as mass spectrometry-based proteomics, high content image analysis of cells and tissues and gel-based imaging.

Scientists started non-agent research operations at the facility in August, and are expected to collaborate on future research programme, even though they are currently working on individual projects.

ECBC is responsible for the country's non-medical chemical and biological defence, while MRICD conducts research in medical chemical countermeasures research and development fields.


Image: Interior of the US Army's newly opened research facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, US. Photo: courtesy of Kristen Dalton, ECBC Public Affairs.