South Korea’s BAACH invests in germ-killing robots


The Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital (BAACH) in South Korea has invested in germ-killing robots to fight drug-resistant pathogens.

The latest investment comes in response to increasing hospital-acquired infections worldwide.

The new Total Room Ultraviolet Disinfector, also called Tru-D Smart UVC, is a mobile, automated disinfection robot that uses patented Sensor 360 technology to fight deadly pathogens, such as Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

This 5-foot-5 germ killing robot can be deployed in hospital operating rooms after an environmental services member cleans the area.

"The command saw this concept as a way to add an additional protocol and supplement our room cleaning process."

The Tru-D SmartUVC is a portable UV disinfection system and is claimed to deliver an automated, measured dose of chemical-free UVC light to consistently disinfect an entire room during a single cycle.

BAACH Chief Operating Room Nurse Major Michelle Wells said: "Although the BAACH has a very low infection rate, below national standards, the command saw this concept as a way to add an additional protocol and supplement our room cleaning process.”

The robot’s performance was validated by more than 12 independent studies and the only CDC-funded randomised clinical trial on UV disinfection.

With automated, measured dosing capabilities and real-time usage-tracking features, Tru-D is said to be one of the most advanced UV disinfection systems currently available.

The patented technology used by the robot helps eliminate human error and ensures that a proper amount of UV light is distributed throughout the room.