BAE launches iMOTR radar system for military test and evaluation ranges


BAE Systems has launched a new mobile multiple-object tracking radar (MOTR) for military test and evaluation ranges at the annual Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, US.

The new iMOTR radar system uses commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies to provide a high degree of accuracy in tracking time, space, and position information (TSPI) for objects in flight.

It features a C-band or X-band active electronically scanned array antenna and enhanced clutter suppression for improved accuracy assessments of object launch data, which provides more precise flight-path tracking for objects travelling close to the ground, BAE stated.

When mounted on a commercial trailer, the radar can also provide high-precision TSPI data on a greater number of multiple objects in flight above modern test range radars.

It is claimed to provide accurate real-time tracking of multiple airborne objects with improved surface clutter rejection for low flying objects, sea skimming weapons, and surface craft.

"Our iMOTR solution is inexpensive compared to the legacy multiple-object tracking radar systems currently in use on test ranges."

Using iMOTR, the test and evaluation community will be able to test larger, more complex scenarios that are critical to developing the next-generation of solutions to enhance national security.

BAE Systems Intelligence & Security sector acting president Mark Keeler said: “Our iMOTR solution is inexpensive compared to the legacy multiple-object tracking radar systems currently in use on test ranges.

“Yet, it delivers the enhanced radar performance capabilities necessary to meet today’s test range requirements and will also reduce test range operation and sustainment costs.”

The ruggedised and weather-proof radar can resist shock, dust, sand, humidity and rain to improve performance and sustainability.


Image: Military test and evaluation ranges can use BAE Systems’ new iMOTR to provide a high degree of accuracy in tracking time, space, and position information for objects in flight. Photo: courtesy of BAE Systems.